Tag Archives: expression

Letting your unconscious mind do the work, as it’s more creative than you ‘think’​.

Several months ago, I came to the conclusion that I was going to start make one drawing a day, so that by the end of one year, I would have 365 little creations. To alleviate the fear and pressure (which we have enough in our daily lives already), I decided that to do this, the drawing would be done on A4 paper, nothing intimidating.

Then several weeks in, a friend of mine posted on an event called 1000 Drawings, whereby guests came to doodle, paint or draw on A5 sized paper. When the organisers collected 1000 drawings, it would then be sold for a nominal price of HK$80 (about US$10) I went to the first one and created 3 mini-doodles. The event was a blast!

People came around to me and thought my work was so creative and cool, and asked what I was thinking of. I said I was thinking of nothing. I don’t think about what I’m creating, but to let the pen just move or guide itself. I call it ‘unconscious creativity’. What surprised me even more was that the creativity or ‘wilder’ side became more apparent on A5 paper than on my usual A4 paper, as I could get something out faster, and faster means less thinking! A5 and doodling is the perfect combination. What’s best is not even think about anything while doodling. Let it just happen. You are not trying to make anything pretty or cool and you are not looking for approval. It’s just putting pen to paper.

When you think of it, doodling is exactly just that. If you have ever doodled or scribbled little drawings onto paper when sitting in a conference or classroom, that is the kind of non-thinking behaviour that is akin to what I’m doing here. It’s mindless, or MIND LESS. Move the mind out of the picture, literally, and let go.

Have a cup of tea and doodle away. Maybe buy yourself a simple doodling pad. It doesn’t even have to be a nice one, preferable A5 size and just let go. The 1000 Drawings HK event augmented by own doodling path and have started a mini-collection I call MISHMASH.

doodles_mishmash

Last week, I held a small doodling session in my studio and invited anyone to drop by to have some fun. What I found when observing people get into their doodling, was that they became very focused and drawn INTO their drawing. I recall the room becoming very silent, although there were about 12 of us. The doodlers became intensely present, which is what I feel and experience when I become thoroughly involved in my own painting or drawing. And when one is in that mode of experience, nothing else matters. There are no problems in life, no fears, no obstacles, no identity. You just are. This is why many of the best and greatest artists become entranced by the profession. Money, relationships, identity become secondary elements to the experience of creating, which to them, is life.

http://normyip.com

Doodling and freeing the mind….

I have found a new fascination with doodling, something that is done by many while talking in the phone, in classrooms, or maybe in conferences (when you zone out from what the speaker is saying). As an artist, strangely, I rarely doodled, but would walk up to a canvas and start working right away. Most of the time, since my work was more along the lines of abstract expressionism, I approached the canvas with an open liberal mind. Then about a month ago, I started to doodle again on A4 paper, to free up my hand on another level or scale using the medium of a ink marker, vastly different from a paint brush or piece of cloth. The tool determines a particular outcome, as much as the size of the artwork. In the samples shown below, these were all created on A5 card paper stock, thick enough to give the feeling that there was a level of importance to what I was doing, but small enough to not be too serious about the output. It was all the right elements in place for me to create without inhibitions and supposedly ‘without thought’. In my investigations I found that not knowing what exactly to do was beneficial to the level of creative output. I wasn’t afraid to draw spiders and insects, something I sort of fear on the daily basis — I hate cockroaches! I drew symbols like crosses, pluses and minus, and ones that did not make any sense. It wasn’t going to matter. I drew shapes and forms that looked like children’s work and latices and fill-in patters of dots and hashes that reminded me of my days working as an architect. At a charity doodle event, the lady across from me said my drawings were like the inner working of my mind, which was so true.

I am wondering if there is something more that can be gained from this particular experience of doodling, and letting things just go, where anything is allowed and nothing is taboo. Could this be something that the everyday person could benefit from? I know that colouring books have been the rage recently, but I personally don’t feel attuned to that. The blank paper and a pen/marker seems much more appropriate. I believe creating the shapes is by far more liberating, offering a more free and creative approach to the tactile experience than choosing colours to fill ‘within the lines’. If anything, we should be crossing and connecting the lines!

To see more of my doodles, please go to http://www.normyip.com/mishmash/

 

‘Dreaming of me’, mixed-media of photography and painting combined

For years, I have resisted the use of photoshop manipulation and layers using frequency separations to create artwork. I always felt it was the easy way out making anything look artistic, and thus, refrained from using this technique in making my work. The majority of my photographic work pertained to the traditional standards of black and white, focusing more on light, shadow, form and texture. Most recently though, I have started to introduce painting back into my staple of mediums, and using ink transfer techniques using a printer and toner to create my art. And the results have been very satisfying. But I also felt it was okay for me to do this also in the realm of computer technology, and using Photoshop to assist in the melding of photography and my acrylics. This one I feel is more successful than ‘Creation, not by chance’.

As this image is not an actual print at this time, it will come a time to actually actualize the artwork. Please let me know if you are interested in owing this; I would be happy to work something out.

Dreaming of me, 2015, mixed media, by Norm Yip
Dreaming of me, 2015, mixed media, by Norm Yip

A little bit more…
Someone on facebook asked me about the above image.

He asks: Is it all digital or did you actually paint over the digital print of Hes?

My reply: Mike, there are 2 elements that are combined: 1) photograph of Hes, and 2) a textured painting. I am attaching the texture painting here. I used Photoshop to combine the two layers together. I can’t remember the frequency separations now since I did several, plus I desaturated some layers.(some colors were quite intense when I layered them). Also, I did a few high passes to the images to make the edges/textures pop out more.

Below is the painting I used to combine the photograph of Hes with. ground