Tag Archives: art therapy

Doodling and freeing the mind….

I have found a new fascination with doodling, something that is done by many while talking in the phone, in classrooms, or maybe in conferences (when you zone out from what the speaker is saying). As an artist, strangely, I rarely doodled, but would walk up to a canvas and start working right away. Most of the time, since my work was more along the lines of abstract expressionism, I approached the canvas with an open liberal mind. Then about a month ago, I started to doodle again on A4 paper, to free up my hand on another level or scale using the medium of a ink marker, vastly different from a paint brush or piece of cloth. The tool determines a particular outcome, as much as the size of the artwork. In the samples shown below, these were all created on A5 card paper stock, thick enough to give the feeling that there was a level of importance to what I was doing, but small enough to not be too serious about the output. It was all the right elements in place for me to create without inhibitions and supposedly ‘without thought’. In my investigations I found that not knowing what exactly to do was beneficial to the level of creative output. I wasn’t afraid to draw spiders and insects, something I sort of fear on the daily basis — I hate cockroaches! I drew symbols like crosses, pluses and minus, and ones that did not make any sense. It wasn’t going to matter. I drew shapes and forms that looked like children’s work and latices and fill-in patters of dots and hashes that reminded me of my days working as an architect. At a charity doodle event, the lady across from me said my drawings were like the inner working of my mind, which was so true.

I am wondering if there is something more that can be gained from this particular experience of doodling, and letting things just go, where anything is allowed and nothing is taboo. Could this be something that the everyday person could benefit from? I know that colouring books have been the rage recently, but I personally don’t feel attuned to that. The blank paper and a pen/marker seems much more appropriate. I believe creating the shapes is by far more liberating, offering a more free and creative approach to the tactile experience than choosing colours to fill ‘within the lines’. If anything, we should be crossing and connecting the lines!

To see more of my doodles, please go to http://www.normyip.com/mishmash/